About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
MSNBC 61
LANGUAGE
English 61
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
. what will the u.s. do in those countries, if anything? plus, does the united states have a responsibility to intervene in the humanitarian crisis that was this woman trashing a liquor store when she did not receive prompt attention from a clerk? we'll discuss. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> american military officials are claiming initial success in isolating moammar gadhafi's regime, after a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according tocy officials, coalition strikes have crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no fly zone is in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, at least not now. one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's compound in tripoli last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown, but he has vowed to fight a quote long, drawn-out war with western forces. >>> meanwhile, the pentagon says there is so far no evidence that civilians in libya have been harmed in the conflict, although it w
>>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our nato allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview, with us, the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> then -- the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my interview this morning with republican from indiana senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that libya is worth
are outgunned and may not be able to take another city. the question before president obama now, should be our u.s. arm the rebels? >> i am not ruling it out or in. >> we will have more from the president in a one-on-one interview with brian williams later in this hour. the air starks' targeted tripoli tonight. 22 tomahawk missiles. the largest air assault in recent days. the defense department says the price tag for u.s. taxpayers so far is about $550 million. that is expected to run about $40 million more over the next three weeks. hillary clinton today called this a turning point in libya when she was in london. she met with one of the rebel leaders. what are you seeing on the ground in libya? >> i still can't get over that number, $550 million to destroy tanks from the air. i don't understand how the price tag gets so high so quickly. it could look like a turning point on the ground, but for gaddafi's forces, he is crushing the rebellion. horrible reports emerging. here in the east, his troops began a counteroffensive, erasing many of the gains they had accomplished. >> at times today the rebe
by the president where u.s. military participation here would end. >>> plus, a troubling turn in japan. workers are pulled from the crippled reactor complex after smoke is seen rising from two of the reactors overnight. how big a setback is this? >>> it's monday, march 21st, 2011. i'm willie geist. chuck and savannah are traveling with the president in south america. we will hear from them later this hour. >>> let's get right to the run down, we begin with operation odyssey dawn in libya. punishing air strikes drove pro-gadhafi forces further from home base last night though it is unclear where gadhafi is at this hour. rebels celebrated after u.s., british and french planes demolished libyan tanks and took out air defenses. overnight the opposition said it had regained almost 40 miles of territory. colonel gadhafi appears to have escaped harm in the attack on his administration building. he has though warned of a long war and said he'd open up the government's arsenal to arm his supporters. >>> on sunday defense secretary robert gates reiterated that the u.s. has no plans to send in ground forc
. >> thank you, jim, for that. >>> president obama says it's not always up to the u.s. to step in when there's turmoil overseas. but in a preview to his national address on monday, the president says the current crisis in libya demands america's attention. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize a national region, then it's in our national interest to act. >> nbc's mike viqueira is our national correspondent on alex. >> what prompted the president to speak out on monday? >> after criticism from the left and the right, democrats and republicans here in washington. the president is suffering from two perceptions here, alex. first, this came very suddenly. usually when americans start to see tomahawks flying off or airplanes in flight drops dropping smart bombs, it comes after weeks if not months of debate. there was no such -- there was no such action. secretary of state hillary clinton was i
clear that no u.s. boots will be on the ground in libya but how long air strikes by u.s. pilots will continue is on everyone's mind right now. those strikes, which include six more tomahawk missile strike have led to a rapid sweep of forces east to west. in the past 49 hours, rebels from taken key towns and striking at sirte, as we speak, the hometown of moammar gadhafi. nbc's chuck todd live at white house here. some of the president's critic says he should have given the speech that we're expecting tonight before the strikes began. >> reporter: well, look, there was even some debate among some supporters of the president on that very notion. but that's -- that's not going to happen. you can't turn back the clock. so the decision was made. they would wait until there was -- they were done with the u.s. portion of this. and so, it's not a mere coincidence that when the handover to nato to run this no-fly zone is taking place, that the president is going to use the occasion to both make the case for why he made this decision, number one, and number two, it's going to be valedicto
shattered by a new round of gunfire that follows a weekend of u.s. led air strikes. president obama answering questions this afternoon for the first time since sending our fighter jets into action. >> the core principle that has to be upheld here is that when the entire international community, almost unanimously, says that there is a potential humanitarian crisis about to take place that a leader who has lost his legitimacy decides to turn his military on his own people, that we can't simply stand by with empty words. >> one of this weekend's bombings badly damaged president gadhafi's compound. pro-gadhafi forces opened fire on a crowd of rebels in mizratah today killing nine of them gaining control of that area seen as critical for gadhafi on a strategic level. what is happening in libya? the latest headline from the uprisingings throughout the middle east look like this away from libya. yemen also in crisis right now. the president is losing his grip on power. he dissolved his cabinet over the weekend but for the growing groups of protesters that's not enough. some of the members
, quote, in the very near future about the u.s. role going forward. the government met with the african union to hammer out a solution. there's violence in other areas of the region as well. in jordan, the associated press reports more than 100 people injured. clashes in ahman were the most i violent in that country in two months of protest. in bahrain, security forces fired tear gas and pellets at anti-government protests. thousands defied a ban on gathering followi ining prayers. and in yemen, the leader says h he's ready to step down, but only if he can leave the government in safe hands. gadhafi is now negotiating. the leaders of tunisia and egypt are already gone. yemen is on the verge of being knocked out, as you heard. these long-running dictatorships are on the ropes. why? because history is changing before our very eyes. there used to be a time when barberism and conquest was par for the course. it was what was expected. the mongols once wiped out a town and destroyed every building, but they also diverted a river that ran through the town. you want to know why? they wanted to
. >>> in chile, president obama tried to clarify. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> senators on both sides of the aisle are concerned about the end game. >> if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. >> we do not have a clear diplomatic policy or a clear statement of foreign policy that is accompanying this military operation. >> there is a growing rift in the coalition over who should be in control. >> no apparent cooperation. some people want to turn it over to nato, the maiamericans and t brits. >> french president ruffled feathers by announcing publicly that french fighters were in the air before his international counterparts were briefed. whoever is in control, arizona republican senator john mccain says, there is only one way to end it. >> a stalemate is a very, very badout come. american policy is that gadhafi must go. >>> a naval facility was hit overnight east of tripoli. robert gates is in moscow. gates says gadhafi is misleading the russia
congress to continue to be involved. nancy pelosi said u.s. action will be strengthened by consultation with congress. last week a lot of them spoke under the democratic side were critical of president obama for not briefing congress in regards to what the mission was in libya. they feel on the democratic side more aware of what that is and want to be briefed regularly. secretary of state hillary clinton will be beyond with the foreign relations committee. they expect a lot of questions to her, but in terms of setting a precedent for the democratic party to believe in, president obama did accomplish that goal. he did not satisfy republicans at all. one interesting caveat i will say, senator john mccain, the president's opponent actually said he enjoyed hearing president obama clearly state what the policy was in libya. he remained shall we say unaware of how gadhafi would be removeed fr per wldikmo iorti outh, t ppti o what the president's actions were there. john mccain maybe going back to the maverick style by being more supportive of president obama than his conference there. >> the
is at the white house. jim, let's begin with you in the pentagon now. what is the u.s. military saying about the report that a french jet attacked and destroyed a libyan aircraft? >> well, there were all sorts of conflicting reports from the beginning after a french pilot radioed in to the command aboard the mt. whitney, the u.s. command ship out there in the mediterranean that he had shot down a libyan war plane. at the time, u.s. officials said they could not confirm it and continued to check, but subsequently, it turns out, and again, these are still conflicting reports, that apparently this french pilot shot a libyan airplane of some kind, whether it was a war plenty, whether it was a air,r enivia ple,has tve e, it landed at misratah or was already on the ground. now, of course, what made the first reports very significant is that would have been the first libyan aircraft, military, that would have challenged this no-fly zone. because not a single helicopter or libyan war plane has been in the sky since the u.s. and coalition war planes started to enforce that no-fly zone. but also, beca
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
in libya, what's the end game, how do we get out? the role the u.s. will play from here on out and how important is it that gadhafi goes. and how did we wind up fighting in a country that even the country's own defense secretary on sunday said is not a vital u.s. interest. tonight, we'll look at what the president needs to say and the big stakes for him politically in lya if the effort for him goes bad. then we'll bring the president's speech live from the national war college here inform washington, d.c. let's begin with andrea mitch l mitchell. and of course, the huffington post's howard fineman who is an msnbc political analyst. what must the president say? here's a couple of clips. >> when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize an entire region and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> that was the radio address on saturday. here's what he said in south america last week about why we're there. >> our military action is in support of an international man
. the president talks about the operation in libya. do we hear more about the u.s. mission there? >>> the winter that would not quit. in some parts of the country, more snow and one spot nearing a spectacular record. >>> look out below. some harrowing moments for one skier who captures his ordeal on the ski slopes on camera. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc saturday." breaking news from the front lines in libya rebels have won a major battle this morning, pushing west from benghazi, maintained control of ajdabiya. allied jets made the difference in ending the week-long battle with government forces. this is a brit tissue jet on friday bombing tanks shelling the city from the outskirts. we are in tripoli. good morning, john. i understand you have information about a disturbing incident at a hotel that's housing the international media. can you tell us what happened? >> reporter: that's right. it is a disturbing incident over breakfast. we are pretty well guarded by gadhafi security forces here. they won't let us out. but somehow this morning, a woman, her name is iman
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
the humanitarian crisis, protect civilians on the ground from moammar gadhafi's forces, but the u.s. position is to have moammar gadhafi leave. secretary of state hillary clinton who and on "meet the press" with gates had the following to say on that score. >> we will provide a very clear messe gaafute' soenng msapear do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> reporter: so again, alex, the president is here in washington at the white house over the course of this weekend preparing for that address tomorrow 7:30 eastern time here in washington. >> mike viqueira at the white house, we'll see you again. msnbc will have live coverage of the presidential address tomorrow evening 7:30 eerng time. >>> let's go to the situation on the ground where rebel forces are breezing through cities held by gadhafi forces as recently as yesterday. the rebels now hold the oil towns of ras lanuf and are pushing westward, a bit closer to tripoli. let's go live to tripoli and jim maceda. the rebels are not facing too muc
difficulties with that connection. >>> gruesome new details about a group of rogue u.s. soldiers on trial for murdering afghan civilians. "rolling stone" magazine publishing photos taken by a tank unit who call themselves the kill team. the shocking pictures you sigh here show the soldiers posing next to their kill, allegedly innocent and defenseless afghans. m mick, the pentagon trying to keep these pictures from the light of day. what's your reaction? >> the reality here is that the u.s. military, the army, first came upon this story almost a year ago when one of the soldiers of that so-called rogue squad there in afghanistan reported the fact that some of the soldiers in the unit had allegedly killed innocent afghan civilians. and in the course of that investigation, it was army investigators who actually uncovered 4,000 photos taken by soldiers. the vast majority of them happy snaps as you would see as if you were on vacation somewhere, but there were about 100, 120 or so showing dead bodies there in afghanistan, totally against afghanistan regulation. but the most egregious part abou
about the lack of air support from nato. as the u.s. and its allies consider whether or not to arm the ragtag opposition forces. providing arms could also mean sending in military trainers that would expand america's involvement even as president obama told brian williams that the u.s. has already accomplished its goals. >> now what we have done is accomplish what we set out to do at the outset, which is to make sure benghazi was not overrun and that thousands potentially of people were not killed. what we have also done is put gadhafi back on his heels. >> brian williams, of course, is the anchor and managing editor of "nbc nightly news" and joins me now. >> sometimes it is nightly noise. >> and most recently there is a lot of nightly concern about what is happening in libya what is happening with the rebels. you asked the key question. and asked whether or not we should be arming the rebels. let's look at part of that exchange. >> with all due respect, mr. president, watching the reportings of our two correspondents in libya, what it appears the rebels need is military equipment.
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
there. and gadhafi forces have been seen retreating about 50 miles to that oil port. the u.s. says they plan to continue striking unless he pulls back. this is a huge moral boost for the rebels who now say all the way to tripoli. for the first time in weeks, forces are moving backwards. it is very difficult work. shelled repeatedly by snipers. fires killed at least 115 people including some people and children. >> thank you very much for the live report. government protestors appear to have seized there. we are joined by ron allen. ron is tracking the new developments this morning for us in syria, jordan and all of the hot spots what is unfolding right now? good morning to you, ron? >> reporter: it's a day when the dust is settling here after violent protest. the first time that has happened in many months of lower level protesting here in jordan. that is what was so stunning. at least two people were dead and hundreds wounded. >> as thousands of syrians took to the streets again. a truck down. the security forces, more than 50 people killed. in the town. the uprising. video posted
or airplanes. he stressed the u.s. is diplomatically supporting the no-fly zone, not the enforcement itself. no american troops on the ground, no american planes, no enforcement itself, that's what we know. what we don't know is a lot bigger. joining us now, eugene robinson, pulitzer prize winning columnist for "the washington post." thanks for being here. >> good evening, chris. >> what do you make of president obama's remarks on libya today? are we now at war? was that the communication? even coming away from it, i had a hard time answering that question for myself. >> when i heard the president's speech, i thought gee, we might be, and here is why. he said very clearly that as far as he's concerned and the united states is concerned, gadhafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. he forfeited the right to be president of libya, and he set these demands, gadhafi has to stop, he has to withdraw, these are not negotiable and there will be consequences. so that to me says we are going to use force to make gadhafi do what we want him to do. >> and of course, if he doesn't do what we want him to do,
are overwhelmed. >>> in sendai, japan, there are signs of recovery. u.s. marines are busy there helping to clear away cars and other debris left in the tsunami's wake. >> we've been clearing it for the past few days, so we're making good progress. >>> let's head to tokyo and nbc's lee cowan who's developing stories there. >> reporter: it all stems from the injuries to the workers we talked about yesterday, the ones that were in the basement level of unit number three. they were trying to strip a cable there. they came in contact with radioactive water and had to be taken to the water. they were actually transferred to a hospital here in tokyo today so they could monitor their condition a little more closely. the consider is that the radiation levels were so high, and the water they stepped in, some 10,000 times that it should be, that the fear is now there is some kind of leak at the reactor itself. they don't know whether it's an actual breach in the core or the pipes themselves that are leaking but something is leaking. we don't know how much or how long it's been leaking and we don't know why
are in libya in the first place. he argued the u.s. had a responsibility to act in order to stop gadhafi from killing his own people, and the president took on critics who say the u.s. has no business getting involved. >> given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interest against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and our to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are. >> but some insist the fundamental questions are still unanswered. house speaker boehner i still habit explained what success in libya will look like. while the president reiterated he wants gadhafi gone, he said that's not part of the mission. >> if we tried to overthrow gadhafi by force, our coalition would splinter. we would likely have to put u.s. troops on the ground to accomplish that mission. or risk killing many civilians in the air. to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> savannah, the speech was necessarily, had to give it. re
operations, including ground attacks, taking over from the u.s.-led force. for more on what's happening with the rebel advance, we want to go to benghazi and richard engel. richard? >> reporter: the rebels here in eastern libya have never been stronger. they have regained in the last 24 hours all of the ground and more that they lost when gadhafi launched a counteroffensive. that counteroffensive which triggered western military intervention. after takinga ag ajdabiya yeste, there was no resistance and they were able to push about 100 miles after ajdabiya drive toward the west without any kind of resistance at all. we drove along this road and we saw on the side of the road the reason why they were able to make such an easy advance. dozens of gadhafi's armored vehicles and tanks that were completely obliterated from the sky. it has opened a corridor that the rebels are now just walking through. the rebels are concerned, however, that as there is this change of command, as nato takes more responsibility, that there will be a less aggressive military posture, a less aggressive series of a
. as of right now it appears that u.s. warplanes will still lead the more difficult mission, attacking the gadhafi ground forces. nbc's jim maceda is live. and richard engel live from the town offage agefag agfag agfafe . >>> we're getting confirmation three months plus or mys now. obviously there'll be adjustments. that mission should begin early next week. there will be dozens of planes from 28 nato countries including the two arab countries, qatar and the eub. right now nato is going to decide on sunday, no latter than tuesday on those two missions, the no-fly zone patrol obviously but also that they be caring out those air-to-ground strikes or will it keep it the way things are and have that done by the u.s.-led coalition. also the no-fly zones by the gadhafi forces. # in reality that's probably two or three fighter jets. there were air strikes, andrea, in tripoli overnight. a number of explosions. after the first time in a week they could another hear the artillery fire in the skies. also there's an ongoing war of the air waves if you will. the latest being a funeral. many of the
. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanwhile, more traces of radiation have been found in the u.s., raising new concerns. today in california one of
the u.s. will play the on going mission in libya. the president will give the address at national defense university. he's expected to assure americans that he can deliver on his vow that the u.s. will be a partner in the action and not in the driver's seat. head of the speech, secretary of state hillary clinton and defense secretary robert gates made the rounds on the sunday talk shows speaking on "meet the press", secretary gates may have added to the confusion about the libyan objective saying u.s. involvement in the country is not a national interest to the united states. >> secretary gates, is libya in our vital interest as a country? >> no. i don't think it's vital interest for the united states. but we clearly have interests there. and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people hear that and say that is striking. not in our vital interest yet we're committing military resources. >> then it wouldn't be fair to what bob said. did libya attack us? no. they did not attack us. but they were doing and gadhafi's history an
to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's something of a mixed message coming from the administration since the military action started a week ago yesterday. it's not only republicans, it's democrats as well. the administration on the one hand has a need to play to the arab street, but they're also now trying to play to main street here in the united states. they have emphasized all along that this is an international coalition that includes arab nations. at one point secretary clinton said we are not in the lead but clearly the united states has been in the lead. they
. thank you very much. >>> now to libya and another day of furious fighting. u.s. navy officials say coalition forces are attacking pro gadhafi troops who have tried to storm populated areas. libyan artillery, mechanized forces and mobile missile sites as well as ammunition supplies are also being targeted. the british say the libyan air force has been destroyed and coalition forces are now flying over the country with impunity. but reports are mixed about the rebels' ability to repel gadhafi's forces in misrata and elsewhere. nbc's jim ma say da joins us live now from tripoli. jim, is this a clear sign the coalition really is stepping up the intensity of their campaign? >> hi, martin. yes, it is a clear sign, and they're stepping up their campaign because they can step up their campaign now. they spent the first four, four and a half days of this operation taking out everything that would prevent them, prevent the airplanes, the nato planes from doing this very thing. they believe that the libyan air defenses as you suggested in your lead now are just about out of commission, which
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
but that's not part of this mission. >> and talking about the u.s.-supported u.n. mission. >> that's correct. >> talking about that. then how do you coincide the two things, protecting civilians enforcing the no-fly zone with what we see happening right now in libya, that the strikes from the air are paving the way for rebel fighters to retake ground? >> but what has happened is gadhafi with the use of helicopters and airplanes was killing his people. as well as he had threatened to go door to door to door once he got into those towns. so the way to prevent him from going door to door is to make sure those tanks and there's no other airplanes by gadhafi flying to bomb his own people. >> so here we are. we're taking action in another muslim country on a day when "rolling stone" is out with this big article with the kill team in afghanistan. jeremy morelock among others, who stands accused. in fact he's convicted of killing afghan civilians and then taking these trophy pictures of them. how much damage does this do to what we're trying to accomplish in afghanistan? >> well, it does.
understanding, as well. and how many did we drop? >> 200. >> this hour, susan rice, u.s. ambassador to the united nations, senator joe lieberman. plus, nearly 30 years to the day since white house press secretary james brady was shot during assassination attempt on president ronald reagan. gun control advocates, jim and sarah brady are here for a rare live interview. >> caught fire. shot fire. >> followup, rawhide is okay? good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama says that the u.s. has done its job in libya and is reallyf trade hand over control to nato but tell take longer than he has said. nbc news has learned today that the handover will not be tomorrow, more likely toward the end of the week. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton is at a libya summit in london today. this morning, she met with an envoy to discuss the next steps. >> we cannot and must not attempt to impose our will on the people of libya, but we can and must stand with them as they determine their own destiny. >> today, a top nato commander said that international pressure will li
of the house of representatives are troubled that u.s. military resources were committed to war without clearly defining for the american people, the congress, and our troops what the mission in libya is and what america's role is in achieving that mission. what should the president do now? should he address the nation? should he meet with members of congress? all of the above? >> maybe all of the above. and i think the way boehner handled that letter was very thoughtful. he waited until the president was back on u.s. soil. as i understand the congressional briefings to date, what happened was bill burns, who's our undersecretary of state for policy briefed the senate on thursday afternoon as they were leaving town. on friday, the president convened the leadership of congress. however, it was a recess day. so most of them were hicked in te telephonically and the telephone didn't work so well. maybe he should have sent a plane to pick them up. but in any event, that briefing was not fully satisfactory. some members said, well, we're just going to be in the back of the line and we're not going to
? no. are we -- do we have u.s. troops on the ground in libya? no. you can call it -- it's been a false argument that some media outlets have tried to engage that -- about the in a moment clayture here. it is the use of military force in concert with our allies. >> again, that presidential finding that president obama signed a couple weeks ago does authorize the cia to provide arms and support, although they've not yet provided the arms. >>> on capitol hill the chairman of the house select intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers, argued for not arming the rebels. >> we don't want to arm the rebels until we know who they are. we know what they're against, moammar gadhafi. we don't know who they're for or what they're for. we've had good experience in our history where things have gone wrong. it's very, very, very important that we take lots of thought, and we have to have lots better intelligence on who they are in total before we would even consider arming the rebels. >> rogers is one of many lawmakers briefed on libya by secretary of state hillary clinton, defense secretary rob
is preparing to take over the military campaign against mullah omar el gadhafi. how big a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge and with war fatigue setting in and criticism coming from both sides of the aisle, president obama will explain what's at stake in libya in an address to the nation on monday evening. plus, fear of spreading terrorism there where anti-government demonstrations and in some cases violence in many arab countries today. in yemen, thousands turned out calling for the ouster of the u.s.-backed president there. if that president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? plus, with hispanics making up one out of every six americans and one out of every four children, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. >>> finally,
is preparing to take over the military campaign against moammar gadhafi. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's at stake in libya for the united states? the white house will address is monday evening. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of the u.s.-backed president there. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the
. officials says the u.s. launched 15 more tomahawk missiles in the last 24 hours this around tripoli. there were also new coalition air strikes against gadhafi's artillery and tank positions, including those vowing to overtake the key rebel-held city of ajdabiya in eastern libya. u.s. officials tell nbc news the u.s. could hand over the lead role to nato as soon as tomorrow. it appears for now u.s. warplanes will lead the difficult mission of attacking gadhafi's ground forces that could threaten libyan civilians. mike viqueira joins us live from the white house. we just learned president obama should be holding a conference call with members of congress. what are you hearing? >> reporter: that's right. jay carney appeared in the briefing room 12 minutes and informed us the president conducted a national security council meeting on the situation in libya this morning, and starting right about now, 2:00, it was scheduled to begin. the president will be calling congressional leaders, a conference call, where he will, quote, consult with them on the situation in libya. and of course, the
this morning from a top u.s. official on the american mission in libya. nbc's david gregory asked defense secretary robert gates about our involvement in the conflict in an interview that will air on "meet the press" later this morning. >> is libya in our vital interest as a country? >> no, i don't think it's a vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there, and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> secretary gates joins secretary of state hillary clinton on today's "meet the press," so check your local listings for that. tomorrow, we will have live coverage of president obama's address to the nation at 7:30 p.m. eastern time. >>> and there is word from syria this morning that 12 people have been killed in violence rocking a seaside mediterranean city. the government says the victims include security forces and residents. this amateur video obtained by the "associated press" was allegedly shot on friday, in which it shows protesters trying to topple a statue of former president assad. in yemen, the president warns of a des
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
: but with allies lacking the firepower to take out strategic targets, officials say the u.s. military has shouldered the bulk of the mission thus far. >> there was no question that we were leading in the first phase. >> reporter: now nato has agandf the other, more difficult task of protecting civilians on the ground. >> this operation has already saved many lives, but the danger is far from over. >> reporter: but while the allied mission aims to keep gadhafi at bay, the president's own goal goes further. >> moammar gadhafi has lost legitimacy to lead and he must leave. >> reporter: saturday at a conservative conference in iowa, mr. obama's libya policy came under attack from republicans. >> reveals the utter lack of clarity in the president's thinking. >> reporter: in his address to the nation tomorrow, experts say the president must explain how the coalition operation helps meet the administration goal of seeing gadhafi leave power. >> we have other policy options to attain our own objectives that are separate from the u.n. mandate, and i think the president's going to have to make that
the u.s. found itself fighting in a country that even the defense secretary says is not a vital united states interest. we'll break down the challenge he faces tonight. >>> plus, there's a lot at stake in libya for president obama. is it possible that politically failure in libya hurts a lot more for the president than victory would help him? >>> when republicans thought it was safe to get back to talking about smaller government, a conference in iowa this weekend has some republicans worried the state is becoming a social conservative outpost and the wrong place to vet candidates for 2012. once again, it was people with very little chance of ever being nominated like michelle bachmann, who had all the applause lines. >>> and new lu elected governors mostly republicans, gave the voters what they asked for -- spending cuts and hope that they'd see their poll numbers move. they're moved all right, downhill. and finally, hbo's bill maher will be on "hardball" tomorrow night. we bring you what his perfect presidential kaed will look like. >>> we start in libya tonight. richard engel is in
to you at home for staying with us for the next hour as well. the u.s. handed over military operations in libya to nato today, sort of. the president of yemen offered to step down today, sort of. the government of canada was toled today, srt f, and pastte ecuin much larger area around the busted nuclear reactors today, sort of. it was a day of huge headlines, with equally huge devils in the details of all of these big stories. but we're going to start with u.s. politics, where we don't really do details. we tend to like things blunt and simple. case in point. there is a magic word in washington politics. the well earned common wisdom about this word is that if you attach this special magic word to a proposal to something the government could spend money on, doesn't matter how bad an idea it is, how many smart people think it is a stupid thing, if it has this magic word attached to it, it becomes politically invincible, can't be killed. the magic word is defense. and it is well earned common wisdom in washington that any spending that is labeled "defense" is pretty much untouchable spen
in pushing back gadhafi forces but so far no concrete details on an end game as to u.s. or foreign involvement. in fact, we heard the pentagon just this afternoon doubling down on this mission. >> we're going to continue to pursue all actions necessary to make him comply with the security council resolution 1973. >> well first egypt, now libya, and it does not stop there know that. yemen, bahrain, syria. what remains a question is whether the u.s. support for the freedom fighters in one country will spread to the others? let's start things off with robert powell, middle east analyst. what's playing out in libya period? >> well, it's essentially a rag tag rebel army, tribal elements plus a regimeรง that's been in place for who 26 years and now obviously western military forces have weighed in to deal with gadhafi and his behavior. >> is the end game a failed state, one new country out of benghazi and another new country out of tripoli? >> it's difficult given how the situation is to give an answer. given how weak the forces are, how ill-equipped, difficult to avoid the partition sc
and the u.s. on plans in libya. since that speech is, rebels armed with anti-aircraft guns have been rooted by gadhafi forces firing from thanks and artillery. the question is this. does the coles need to arm the rebels with weapons capable of taking on gadhafi's force ss? speaking to brian williams, the president said he's not ruling it out. >> we're still making an assessment partly about what gadhafi's forces are going to be doing. we're not taking anything off the table at this point. >> nbc's mike viqueira is live at the white house. vick, so the president playing it safe? >> you might say that. the administration has maintained since the beginning of this that the united states security council resolution that is the grounds for all of this military action permits the arming of the rebels. there are obviously a lot of pitfalls here starting with the history of such a practice. you look back in american history terrorist afghanistan with the mujahadin, many of those arms turned against amicfoes gollhe wba go anotr atitidung t '70s and '80s. nicaragua would be another example. fraught
that the u.s. intervened to prevent the slaughter of civilians. before we show you more of what he had to say let's go rapid fire around the table. pat buchanan, five seconds or less, how would you characterize the president's speech? >> left more questions open than answered. >> donny deutsche? >> i thought it was fantastic. >> of course you did. >> he looked like a leader and showed power of track cattle. >> i think it was solid. and holes in others. >> i still don't get his attempts to explain it why we don't go into syria again and another country. >> that was the question left unanswered. speaking in washington last night the president insisted not taking action would have been a betrayal of who we are as americans. >> if we waited one more day, benghazi, a city nearly the size of charlotte,ed the conscience the world. it was not in our national interest to let that happen. i refused to let that happen. >> he ruled out targeting moammar gadhafi. warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a mistake as costly as the war in iraq. >> if we tried to overthrow gadhafi by force, our co
it comes to how the u.s. would get involved in, say, a syria or a yemen or pbahrain. it seems as if officials today, the whole goal of this briefing was to make sure reporters understood that libya was not a precedent for anything. >> well, it was very striking this weekend on "meet the press" to watch secretary gates and secretary clinton trying to define first from the defense secretary, defining what is in our national interests. this was gates first and then clinton. >> no, i don't think it's vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people would hear that and say that's quite striking. not in our vital interests and yet we're committing military resources to it. >> but then it wouldn't be fair to what bob just said. did hib ilibya attack us? no, they did not attack us. >> but they did have interest with our allies and our allies have been standing with the united states in afghanistan for a decade when they were not attacked. so that's the cas
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)